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Since 1995 the Tiffany Mills Company has created multiple collaborative works. Below are those pieces created in the last decade.

Berries and Bulls

length
60 minutes
premiere
2013
BAM Fisher

collaborator
Peter Petralia (Dramaturge)

In berries and bulls, four people vibrating on different frequencies try to connect. They misread signals; push touching to extremes; and taunt each other into playing physically risky games. The stakes are high for these relationships to fail. But, by tipping reality on its side -- with a few personal and fantastical stories -- the performers find an entry point for communicating and questioning: How much can we rely on others? How will we endure together over time? Peter Petralia (Dramaturge), Kay Cummings (Advisor), and four performers (Jeffrey Duval, Kevin Ho, Emily Pope-Blackman, and Petra van Noort) join choreographer Tiffany Mills to examine interpersonal relationships.

Tomorrow's Legs

length
70 minutes
premiere
2009
Danspace Project

collaborator
Peter Petralia (Dramaturge)

Tomorrow's Legs is made up of stories inspired by our memories, however true or false. Choreographer Tiffany Mills, experimental theater artist Peter Petralia, editing advisor Kay Cummings, and performers Jeffrey Duval, Luke Gutgsell, Whitney Tucker, and Petra van Noort, mix words and movement to excavate the past. We remember a father's surprising retort, a missing dog, River, and a forever-lost brother. These memories are triggered by a freshly squeezed orange, a tiny relic in the attic, and seven stitches above the eye. We intersect our collective past by traveling from Quito, Ecuador to Hamburg, Germany. On this escapade, Chris Hudacs and Naoko Nagata light and dress us. Vicious partnering, delicate gestures, straight-up story telling and a touch of foolery combine as we dig into the crevices of our mind. Memory, with all its richness and failings, will be our connective tissue.

Landfall

length
60 minutes
premiere
2007
Joyce SoHo

collaborators
Ikue Mori
(Composer), Ela Troyano (Filmmaker)

With choreography and direction by Tiffany Mills; video by award-winning Cuban-born filmmaker Ela Troyano; and music by internationally acclaimed Japanese composer Ikue Mori, these three diverse female artists blend their individual media and backgrounds, live and improvised in performance. Mills, Mori and Troyano will chart a journey of six dancers in three consecutive duets. Mills draws inspiration for these duets from the vast power and emotional resonance of a storm as it explodes upon the multitudes: accumulation, landfall, breach.

Godard

length
20 minutes
premiere
2006
Duke/42nd Street

collaborator
John Zorn (Composer)

With music inspired by the films of Jean Luc-Godard, innocence and purity share the stage with corruption, contempt, and darker life experiences as this urban fairytale unfolds. Layering film, movement and music to achieve "dramatic color" (New York Times), Troyano, Mills and Zorn probe the complexities of human relationships, with a touch of whimsy in the Company's newest work. "Sad truths alternate with much needed comic relief." (OffOffOff.com)

Goetia

length
17 minutes
premiere
2003
Works & Process/
Guggenheim Museum

collaborator
John Zorn (Composer)

Live music drives Goetia, an exhilarating dance where the performers fly through the air in eight full-bodied visual poems. Jennifer Choi, a leading violinist of her generation, plays Zorn's idiosyncratic score. Back Stage describes Mills' feisty quartet as having "fast, intelligent interplay between sounds and choreography."

Elegy

length
35 minutes
premiere
2003
Works & Process/
Guggenheim Museum

collaborator
John Zorn (Composer)

"Topsy-turvy bodies in a gothic universe" (New York Times) are revealed in a combustible world of shadows and split personalities. Elegy's terrain is a matrix of triggered emotions, where flowers and harrowing dreams co-exist. The New Yorker calls this multi-dimensional work "A technically demanding dance-theater piece, conjuring the violence of a Hitchcock denouement."


© TMC 2011  |  photos © 2011: Julie Lemberger
website: www.bartokweb.com (2003)  |  www.eminjaydesign.com (2011)
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